Friday, August 1, 2014

Silver falls fails, go for the licorice…

Last April I shared my idea for filling in new (winter death caused) gaps in the front garden plantings. I needed something to bind the smaller plants together while I waited for the Blue Pacific Shore Junipers to grow and be the glue. My solution = annuals. I bought several Dichondra argentea 'Silver Falls' (silver pony foot) and Helichrysum petiolare (licorice plant), 5 of each. Photo taken the day I planted…

I decided the silver sheen and smaller leaves of the dichondra would look best in the open area around the agaves, optunia and cylindropuntia. Which meant the larger “felty” leaves of the licorice plant were destined for the upper areas along the house and sidewalk.

I made the wrong decision. Can you even spot the dichondra?

‘Silver Falls’ has failed in a big way.

It’s just sitting there, not doing a thing.

Seemingly not changed a bit since the day I planted it 3 and a half months ago!

Whereas the licorice plant has gone a little crazy.

Growing up and out and canoodling with its neighbors.

Obviously a better choice for my situation. However the title of this post is a little misleading, because when planted correctly ‘Silver Falls’ is a huge success…

The key evidently is that it needs to fall, gravity helps, this plant is not a great creeper.

So I’m calling the hanging Dichondra argentea 'Silver Falls' my favorite plant in the garden this week and sharing the stats:
  • grown as a perennial in USDA Zones 9-11, a fast growing annual in the colder zones
  • eventually reaches 6ft wide (long?) and 6-12" tall
  • prefers well drained soil and doesn't need a lot of water
  • likes the sun and is heat tolerant
Any annual successes or failures in your garden this summer?


All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Visiting Old German Town Gardens (finally)...

This is a garden I've heard many stories about, but had never actually visited. Seems every time they open for Hardy Plant Society of Oregon members I'm out of town. When the GB Fling planning committee visited last summer to qualify the garden as one we wanted to include I was off celebrating my parents 50th Wedding Anniversary. So finally the Friday of the Fling I was here!...

I'd anticipated this vista, and knew the garden was huge, but reality far exceeded my expectations.

Also, I need to mention this garden isn't tended by a huge staff, it's all the work of the owners; Bruce and Jerry. Two very talented and hard working gardeners (rumor has it Jerry makes a mean batch of cookies too, I've still yet to experience that part of the visit...).

They've obviously perfected the art of the well placed container...

My memory is a little hazy (I did have to hurry through the garden) but I believe there is a series of small, shady ponds.

And then you're back out in the bright sunlight...

And just like that right back into the deep shade.

There were tall sentinels, both natural...

And man-made...

A lovely crimson blush.

And HUGE schefflera leaves.

In too dark of shade to get a great shot of the entire plant.

Oh, back out into the light...

Thirsty? I love the rock tucked in just so to keep the water flowing.

Now we're approaching my favorite part of the garden, the steep hillside climbing back up to the house level...

Annette up on the patio with a sea of agaves below.

The conifer next to the Yucca rostrata has an exotic protea family-like look about it, don't you think?

Up on the patio a tall, tall, tall, tetrapanax tops out next to a low wall.

Once upon a time blooming phormium were everywhere in Portland. Not so much these days (cold winters) so seeing these twisty seed pods was extra special.

Then I turned just a bit to my right and POW!

Looking back down to where I had been...

There was a green house too!

And finally before leaving I tucked into the house (cookies were just going into the oven) and back out on the deck to look down on another monster tetrapanax...

What a new way of seeing a beloved plant!

A better sense of the area below the patio and even the greenhouse (on the far right)...

This garden is truly breathtaking. There is something for everyone here and it's all magical. I am thrilled to finally have seen it!

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Nice green roof!

Portland is known as a green city. Both for our environmental practices as well as our rain-fueled, mossy-green, garden culture. Turns out we've also got some pretty fabulous green roofs...

What you don't see it? Look a little closer...

Nice...

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.